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Glen Canyon Institute

Dedicated to the restoration of Glen Canyon and a free flowing Colorado River.

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Press Release

Glen Canyon Historical Story Map

Glen Canyon Institute and National Geographic are proud to present the Glen Canyon Historical Story Map.


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Major Initiative

GCI urges BOR to Fill Mead First

Glen Canyon Institute (GCI) has called on the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) to implement the Fill Mead First plan, which could save massive amounts of water.


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In The News

Should the Bureau of Reclamation be abolished?

Last month, Clinton-era Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Daniel Beard published a book calling for the abolition of his own former agency. Deadbeat Dams: Why we should abolish the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and tear down Glen Canyon Dam also makes a case for the eradication of defunct dams. But dam removal and the obliteration of a longstanding federal agency are only two of Beard’s many suggestions for dealing with persistent drought. HCN recently spoke with Beard about his book and how water policy should evolve in anticipation of climate change. Read More »

The Other Big Drought Story You Need to Pay Attention To

With California’s scary, record-breaking drought capturing so much attention lately, an important bit of news about the dearth of water across a much larger region has gotten short shrift. I’m talking about the Colorado River Basin, which supplies water to 40 million people in seven states — including Californians. Over the long run, the Colorado has been providing less than it once did, even as demand for its water has risen. And this year, as in most years during the past 15, the water situation in the river basin is not looking good. Read More »

Low tide: Lake levels have fallen so far it will take years to catch up

PHOENIX -- It's been at least 20 years since water levels have been normal at Lake Powell and Lake Mead and that isn't going to change anytime soon, said a local climate expert. Arizona State University climatologist Randy Cerveny said it would take at least five years of heavy snowpack in Colorado to porperly feed the Colorado River. The snowpack is down approximately 20 percent from last year. The river supplies the water for both reservoirs, which are less than half full. Lake Mead in Nevada is 140 feet below capacity. Read More »